Human Rights in New Zealand

26-01-2015 - January, Turangawaewae: Human Rights Commission News

Type: Newsletter

Ngā mihi o te tau hou, greetings for the new year! The Commission is starting 2015 with a new e-newsletter. Tūranga (standing place), waewae (feet), is often translated as ‘a place to stand’. Tūrangawaewae are places where we feel especially empowered and connected. This also symbolises New Zealanders standing in and standing up for freedom […]

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26-01-2015 - Stereotyping entire ethnicities as bad pet owners wrong and offensive

Type: Media Release

Sweeping claims by an SPCA spokesman stereotyping entire races as irresponsible people who don’t care about their pets are “unhelpful, wrong and incredibly offensive to a lot of people” says Race Relations Commissioner Dame Susan Devoy. “The SPCA do great things but race profiling pet owners isn’t one of them. Some of us are great […]

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23-01-2015 - Disability – top of mind

Type: News, Opinion piece

Last September Disability Rights Commissioner Paul Gibson came back from reporting to the United Nations Committee on the Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities (CRPD) very clear about what the New Zealand Government needs to do to meet its obligations under the Convention. The CRPD clarifies that disabled people have the same rights […]

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23-01-2015 - New Chief Executive for HRC

Type: News

The Commission’s new chief executive started a couple of weeks ago. To read about her professional background click here. Tūrangawaewae asked her a few questions… Do you think being from America you bring a different perspective to human rights issues than other New Zealanders? I think anyone that immigrates to a new country learns a […]

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23-01-2015 - Treaty of Waitangi and UNDRIP

Type: News, Opinion piece

When thinking of United Nations declarations it is easy to think that any documents, treaties or agreements are very ‘high level’ and therefore probably too hard to make sense of or just something for governments to refer to. After talking with Commissioner for Māori and Indigenous Rights, Karen Johansen about the United Nations Declaration on […]

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23-01-2015 - Bosses need to adhere to human rights law around religion

Type: News

Sometimes religious practices like praying or fasting or taking particular days of rest are required on normal working days. This is sometimes a dilemma for bosses to accommodate, and also for an employee who values their job and appreciates that there is ongoing work to be done. But whose rights take precedence – the employer’s […]

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23-01-2015 - Race Relations Commissioner Dame Susan Devoy’s interviewed with Al Jazeera

Type: News

Race Relations Commissioner Dame Susan Devoy was recently interviewed by Al Jazeera online. Here is an abridged version of the story they published. What are the social challenges New Zealand is facing relating to race and faith communities? The face of New Zealand is younger and more ethnically diverse than ever before. One-in-10 Kiwis are […]

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23-01-2015 - Changing of the guard

Type: News

The Commission’s new Chief Executive, Cynthia Brophy, started on 15 January 2015. Cynthia has been working at general management level for over 20 years and has had major roles in both the private and public sectors. Cynthia’s strengths are in building relations with community, government and business, and effective organisational management. Cynthia’s most recent role […]

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19-01-2015 - ANZAC Day: public survey

Type: Partner News, Research

Saturday 25th of April is ANZAC Day, and this year will also mark the the 100th anniversary since the ANZAC landings at Gallipoli. As part of this Monash University is conducting a research project that is exploring the meaning and history of Anzac Day. It involves researchers in Australia, Aotearoa/New Zealand, Singapore, the United Kingdom, France and Turkey. […]

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22-12-2014 - Many care residences not monitored for ill-treatment

Type: Media Release

Chief Commissioner David Rutherford says that while most places of detention are monitored for ill-treatment, there are many, such as locked aged-care facilities and community-based homes for disabled persons, which are not. Thousands of New Zealanders in detention or in other places where they do not have freedom of movement are vulnerable to human rights […]

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