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Newsletters > Diversity Action Programme > Nga Reo Tangata: Media and Diversity Network

Neighbourhood (Sunday, 11am, TV1) is a high-quality, weekly documentary showcasing the best of New Zealand’s ethnic, religious and cultural diversity. It’s moving, enlightening, entertaining – just the sort of thing that makes you proud to be part of one of the most diverse countries in the world. The only problem is hardly anyone even knows it exists, let alone watches it regularly.

South African-born singer, actress and TV personality Megan Alatini with the Satellite Media crew filming for the Papatoetoe episode of Neighbourhood.

South African-born singer, actress and TV personality Megan Alatini with the Satellite Media crew filming for the Papatoetoe episode of Neighbourhood.

It’s hard not to cry as Cambodian-born Niborom Oum tells her story. A teacher studying in New Zealand in 1975 when the  Khmer Rouge closed her country, she lost her husband, her two children, her brothers and sisters to the murderous regime.

As she sits in front of the crew of Auckland production company Satellite Media, making the Miramar episode of TV1 programme Neighbourhood, she talks about that horrific time, and about the book she is writing telling the stories of other Cambodian women now living in New Zealand.

It is not just Oum who is in tears. The producer, the cameraman; half the crew is crying. This is a powerful true story, a history lesson, a message about tolerance, a reason to be proud of – not wary about – our growing ethnic diversity.
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diversity-project-graphic-copy--webAs a ‘Community Access’ radio station Free FM is creating fantastic opportunities for YOU to do something really positive for your community. We have two programme zones reserved exclusively for migrant and refugee community content – and our plan is to completely fill every hour in these zones with great radio – shows about issues, shows about culture, shows about politics, and most importantly, shows in a wide range of languages.
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Verica_Media_and_DiversityA New Zealand-based journalism academic is looking for more discussion of the role of the media in promoting diversity, and more cooperation among New Zealand organisations to promote responsible and equitable reporting in a multicultural society

Verica Rupar knows first hand the power of the media to foster cultural and religious diversity – or to fan the flames of racial hatred. As a Serbian journalist living in conflict-torn Yugoslavia in the 1990s, Rupar watched how media reporting of the war reproduced and intensified racial stereopypes and human rights violations, not the reverse.

Rupar’s early experience has shaped her career. Now an associate professor and head of the journalism programme at AUT University in Auckland, a key focus for her has been getting journalism students around the world to recognise the importance of ethical reporting on diversity issues, and to understand the consequences of unethical, discriminatory or unbalanced journalism.
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Kirwan Heralds Diversity

Diversity was a big focus for The New Zealand’s Herald’s first paper with a guest editor – the Sir John Kirwan issue on December 10. The Herald says feedback was positive, prompting some to ask whether it might not be in the best interest of the mainstream media to go further in promoting Auckland’s cultural variety.
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Barbara Dreaver is one of several high profile journalists in New Zealand with Pacific Island backgrounds.

Barbara Dreaver is one of several high profile journalists in New Zealand with Pacific Island backgrounds.

It was 2008. Jim Tucker, then head of the Whitireia journalism school in Wellington, had won a battle he’d been fighting for years – to get funding to offer scholarships to get young Pacific people to go into the media. Five bright Pacific students began studying journalism at Whitireia that year, and at the end of the course three of these students were in the top five graduates overall. All of them went on to have successful careers in journalism or communications.

Tucker was in buoyant mood. He figured a few years of scholarships would see New Zealand start to redress the imbalance which saw Pacific people making up 7 per cent of the population, but a far smaller percentage of the country’s media professionals. At last, Pacific people would be able to tell their own – and other peoples’ – stories, from a Pacific perspective.

Tucker’s optimism was short lived. A new Government won the 2008 election, and Whitireia’s Pasifika scholarship money was pulled almost immediately. The school was left $40,000 out of pocket funding the existing scholarships for the remaining two years of the programme. And that was that.

Despite the efforts of Whitireia and other journalism and communications programmes around the country, it has been hard to recruit Pacific students into communications, and Pacific media representation in New Zealand is in much the same situation it was 10 or 20 years ago: not representative of New Zealand Pacific peoples population, estimated to reach 10 per cent of New Zealanders over the next 15 years.


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It all started with a 2008 headline in an Auckland newspaper: “Number of Indians rising in Mt Eden prison” – or words to that effect. Engineer and businessman Giri Gupta, an Auckland resident for more than a decade, was horrified. Was this evidence of an Indian criminal class in his adopted country? Then, as he read on, his horror turned to anger about the way the story was being reported. The number of Indians in Mt Eden prison had gone from three (yes, three) to five – hardly a crime epidemic given the 100,000 Indians living in Auckland at the time.

Photo of Indian Weekender co-founder Mr Giri Gupta

Indian Weekender co-founder Mr Giri Gupta

Why was it, Gupta wondered, that Indian New Zealanders only read about themselves when things went wrong, not when they were successful? The idea of a fortnightly weekend newspaper highlighting the achievements of New Zealanders of Indian origin was born. Gupta teamed up with friend and fellow businessman Bhav Dhillon, owner and director of construction products company Cemix, and the paper was launched in April 2009.

There were two more founding principles, Gupta says: controversial issues (like the recent story about Kiwi companies exploiting Indian students) were to be treated as topics for debate, not censure, and above all there was to be “no Masala news” – a reference to the popular spicy Indian tabloid gossip.

“Our main purpose is to project the positive-ness in the Kiwi Indian community here. Because you could fill volumes and volumes about Indian people that are achievers. And instead you only hear about the one Indian person caught stealing from a petrol pump.

“I wouldn’t have considered it if it hadn’t been for that article. Now it has become a passion. Now I won’t give it up.”

In recession-hit 2009 New Zealand, everyone said the paper would be dead in six months.

They were wrong. Four years on, the Indian Weekender  has passed its 100th issue, has a readership of around 60,000 and an average of 20,000 unique visitors to its website every month. There is a 4500-subscriber newsletter, and iPad and smartphone apps. The paper has just started being distributed in Christchurch and there are plans to go to Hamilton and beyond.

 

But the focus is still the same, Gupta says: to celebrate local heroes and highlight Indian success stories.

A glance through past issues shows no shortage of Indian talent to highlight. Take Anand and Sarita Kumble, biochemists who trained in India and worked at top US universities before setting up an Auckland-based biotechnology firm, Pictor Ltd. The there’s Jacob Rajan, internationally-acclaimed playwright and actor (Krishnan’s Dairy, The Pickle King and others), or Ranjna Patel, founder and director of the East Tamaki Healthcare Group, or Vanisa Dhiru, CEO of Volunteering NZ and a nominee for young New Zealanders of the Year in 2010.

Indian Weekender’s “Kiwi Indian Hall of Fame” issue profiles more than 60 successful, talented New Zealanders of Indian descent.

Still, whether the message about Indian Kiwis is permeating beyond the Indian community is debateable. Sure, if you are an Indian-born sports star, you are going to be high-profile. And some Indian Weekender stories have been picked up by other media, Gupta says.

But it’s hard not to feel most Indian achievers are largely invisible to the mainstream media; Indian success stories are not much more likely to be reported now as they were in 2008. Take the most recent New Zealand New Year Honours list.

Of the eight people of Indian origin on the list (Gupta is one of them) and only one, cricketer Parbhu Kanji, appears to have been profiled in the mainstream media. On the other hand, the majority of the Pakeha achievers have been been interviewed at some stage for print, radio or TV.

“We are there to give talented people a voice that’s unheard in the Fairfax papers or the New Zealand Herald,” says business manager Gaurav Gupta, who worked in television in India before joining the Indian Weekender 18 months ago.

Other roles the paper plays include valuing and protecting Indian heritage and culture, and letting the community know about news and events that affect them, says editor Shriya Bhagwat-Chitale. She says reporters are working with the Auckland Council to highlight information (from dog licence rules to new rates provisions) that a new immigrant might otherwise miss. And the paper also profiles the major festivals and events in Auckland of potential interest to an Indian audience.

The paper is the media sponsor for many big-name Indian acts coming to New Zealand, Gaurav Gupta says.

“There are 180,000 New Zealanders of Indian origin. They may become Kiwis, adopt English, but they prefer to listen to Bollywood songs, so our role is to make them aware of who’s coming here.”

The Indian Weekender business breaks even – not a bad result for media organisation in these troubled times.

But making money isn’t why Giri Gupta runs the paper. “It’s not a business. It’s a community service. It’s my way of giving back to the community.”

Gupta’s chain of four Auckland motels “puts food on the table”, and Gaurav Gupta says his boss rejects any suggestion of a cover price – however small.

“He wants everyone to get a copy who wants one.”

And whatever profits the paper makes are ploughed back into charities like St John Ambulance.

 

Portrait of Philip Patston

Philip Patston wants to see more disabled characters and actors on our screens.

Strangers often come up to Philip Patston in the street and ask him why they don’t see him on TV anymore. His 10-year career as a comedian ended almost a decade ago. But he’s still recognised as that funny, gay, vegetarian guy with cerebral palsy from Pulp Comedy and Shortland St.

It doesn’t worry Patston that he’s left the media spotlight to become a campaigner for social change around disability and diversity. What does baffle him is the lack of “unique” (read disabled) talent to replace him on New Zealand screens.

Part of the answer is to do with Patston’s personality. It takes a certain sort of person – confident, stubborn, dissatisfied, risk-taking – to fight the mainstream. But it’s more than that: Patston recognises getting more disabled people on our screens is about changing entrenched attitudes.


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Race Relations Commissioner Dame Susan Devoy, will open the ninth NZ Diversity Forum at Te Papa on 26 August. The forum is a unique national event, at which people involved in race relations, human rights and cultural diversity come together to share ideas and good practice.  
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Prominent Muslim blogger Anjun Raman, NZ Herald columnist Dita di Boni and Victoria University Professor of Religious Studies Paul Morris are panellists debating the portrayal of religion in the media at the New Zealand Diversity Forum at Te Papa on Monday 26 August. The panel will discuss the responsibilities and roles the media has in reporting on religious issue and whether religious groups have a clear understanding of the role and responsibility of the media. Chaired by Commissioner Richard Tankersley, the forum is  hosted by NZ National Commission for UNESCO and supported by the  Victoria University Religious Studies Programme (VUW) and the Human Rights Commission.

Al Nisbet’s Marlborough Express cartoon 29 May 2013

Al Nisbet’s Marlborough Express cartoon 29 May 2013

Cartoonists’ social commentary tends to come through pictures, not words. But the controversy around the Al Nisbet “Food in Schools” cartoons has promoted lively debate among cartoonists over the role – and the limits – of their craft.

Auckland cartoonist Malcolm Walker doesn’t like the Al Nisbet food in schools cartoons. He thinks the two cartoons, published at the end of May in the Marlborough Express and The Press, are racist − and not funny. But he defends the right of cartoonists to cover controversial topics − including ones to do with race.
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Portrait of Mark Pearson

Mark Pearson

The pressure of slashed media budgets, faster news schedules and attempts by Governments to control the flow of information is making it harder for journalists to do their job – truth-seeking and truth telling. And that isn’t good for cross-cultural news coverage, says Professor Mark Pearson.

Mark Pearson is a self-styled “press freedom worrier”. Yes, worrier, not warrior. As a journalism professor and Australian correspondent for Reporters Without Borders, Pearson worries about newsroom cost-cutting that has seen seasoned foreign correspondents replaced by inexperienced “parachute journalists”. He worries that the fast-pace of modern news deadlines makes it difficult to get to the real story in cultures where the sharing of information involves a measured process of gaining trust, not grabbing a 30-second sound bite. He worries that governments in many countries (in the developed as well as the developing world) are imposing more restrictions on press freedom – often in the name of anti-terrorism provisions, or protecting the public from rogue media.
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Top race job often a rugged ride

Race relations is like white water rafting, said New Zealand’s fourth Race Relations Conciliator* Wally Hirsh. You start the journey and it may go smoothly for a while, then for a period you may have a bit of a rugged ride, then you get to calm waters again, then turbulence. But the thing to remember is it’s worth being part of the experience. “The journey is a lot more interesting if you take part, than if you stand on the banks and watch it go by.”


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The prognosis on Prosser

New Zealand writer Brannavan Gnanalingam says ‘looking Muslim’ already poses big problems when he travels

The now infamous “airport-security-confiscated-my-pocket-knife, so-no-young-Muslims (or-anyone-who-looks-like-a-Muslim-or-comes-from-a-Muslim-country) should-be-allowed-to-fly” column by New Zealand First MP Richard Prosser first appeared at the end of January.
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The Human Rights Commission is offering free workshops for individuals, NGOs and civil society to participate in New Zealand’s Universal Periodic Review, a review of the country’s realisation of human rights by the United Nations.


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It was a year when there were no violent protests, no politicians got jostled or had mud thrown at them, and serious issues like Māori water claims, family violence and youth suicide got an airing. So why did media coverage of Waitangi Day focus almost exclusively on conflict?


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The development of social media in recent years has outpaced the national and international regulatory frameworks established to encourage and maintain ethical and human rights standards in the print, radio and television media.


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For the final issue of Nga Reo Tangata for 2012, we asked a number of ethnic, Māori and Pacific media outlets what were the stories that mattered most to their audiences.

Nga Reo Tangata Nov 2012

Māori TV’s Julian Wilcox says child abuse is the most pressing issue for his audience


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Sometime on the weekend of September 22, a Facebook page was born: “Let’s End the Māori Race”. It didn’t get much media coverage, but the message of racist incitement sparked complaints – to the Human Rights Commission, to Māori organisations, but mostly to Facebook itself via “Report story” buttons.


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On Saturday August 25, the Dominion Post newspaper published a story about the decision by Lower Hutt’s Dowse art gallery to run an exhibition, part of which would be off-limits to men. Banning blokes from watching footage of Muslim women at home without their veils could count as sex discrimination, the paper reported.

Dominion Post, 25 August

Dominion Post, 25 August


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Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten published 12 cartoons about the Prophet Muhammad in 2005 that sparked worldwide protests and loss of life. Those of Muslim faith are forbidden from depicting the Prophet Muhammad. The newspaper later apologised for publishing the cartoons.


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What do public relations practitioners have to learn when it comes to Auckland’s growing diverse communities?

Ngareo August


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Registrations are still open for the annual New Zealand Diversity Forum at the Aotea Centre, Auckland on 19-20 August.


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From this month Māori Television has increased the amount of Te Reo content to strengthen its language revitalisation focus. 


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Arohatia te Reo – cherish the language’ is the theme for this year’s Māori Language Week, which runs from 23-29 July.

arohatiatereo


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Fairfax internships

Fairfax is calling for students interested in a journalism career to apply for its intern scheme. 


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New TVNZ Board member

Therese Walsh has been appointed to the board of Television New Zealand this month. 


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Planning is well underway for the 2012 New Zealand Diversity Forum, to be held on 19-20 August at Aotea Centre in Auckland.

NZDF Flyer 2012


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Two rulings by the Press Council that upheld complaints against columns by prominent commentators Michael Laws and Paul Holmes are arguably the most significant decisions on race issues since the Press Council upheld complaints against the Asian Angst: Is it time to send some back home? by Deborah Coddington in North and South magazine published in December, 2006.


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TV One’s Close Up featured a Northland man Wikatana Popata talking about a hikoi in protest about the Government’s proposed asset sales last month.  Popata made the most of his air time and said he had “had enough of Pakeha”, and wanted the Treaty of Waitangi thrown out so Māori could rule the country. 


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Who watches the digital watchers?

Increasingly the public gets its news from online sources. The Law Commission has released a discussion paper on the potential rights, responsibilities and regulatory framework for digital news media.


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The incident in Christchurch last month where a man suffering from a mental illness allegedly kidnapped a woman and stabbed another man was quickly followed-up with offensive commentary in the newspapers, on the radio and internet sites. 


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Muslim Barbie quips not offensive

A complaint about comments made on National Radio that there could be a market in the Muslim world for “Terrorist Barbie” was not upheld by the Broadcasting Standards Authority. 


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Reviving Te Reo TV

The 100 per cent Maori language channel, Te Reo, is turning four this year and extending its broadcast hours to include more youth and children’s programming. 


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Sky TV, Murray and the Muslim All Black

There was a bit of a flurry last weekend when Fairfax media website stuff.co.nz published a report on Murray Deaker’s alleged comments on Sky TV that All Black Sonny Bill Williams being a Muslim in a so-called Christian country made him uncomfortable.


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Race Relations Day

Don’t forget it’s Race Relations Day this coming week, on Wednesday 21 March.


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White or Wong? Unlocking the Bamboo Door is a discussion being held on the 28th of March in Auckland. 


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Thakur Ranjit Singh is a former Fiji Daily Post publisher who has graduated from the Auckland University of technology with a thesis shedding new light on businessman George Speight’s attempted coup in 2000. 


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Student scoops lead article

A post graduate student from the AUT’s Pacific Media Centre produced the lead article in the December 2011 edition of the Metro magazine.


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Online Pacific research improved

The AUT’s Pacific Journalism Review has launched a new website archiving regional media research from the last 20 years.  


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Singing prisoners on TV

Last year local musicians Anika Moa, Warren Maxwell, Maisey Rika and Ruia Aperahama went into Rimutaka and Arohata prisons to teach song-writing to 10 prisoners.


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Seeking Creative Pacific writer

Creative New Zealand and Fulbright are inviting applications for this year’s Pacific Writer’s Residency. 


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The AUT’s Pacific Media centre has just co-published a book with PNG’s Divine Word University. 


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The High court trial of the four alleged terrorists in Tūhoe is expected to end over the next two weeks and an Auckland documentary maker is appealing for donations so she can complete a festival length documentary on the New Zealand activists and their community that has been caught up in the case. 


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Money for Music

New Zealand On Air is funding 33 new music projects from its February Making Tracks funding round. 


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The Human Rights Commission has published its annual review of developments in relation to media and diversity. The review is part of the annual race relations report Tūi Tūi Tuituiā: Race Relations in 2011.


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Paul Holmes column draws complaints

A column headlined “Waitangi Day a complete waste” by broadcaster Paul Holmes in the Weekend Herald revealed a viewpoint on Māori that has offended many New Zealanders.


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Stratos ends broadcast

The demise of Stratos Television on the freeview digital platform in December contributed to the reduction in the diversity of voices on screen. Unfortunately the Statros initiative from a group of regional broadcasters proved economically unsustainable.


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The Law Commission’s review of what is news media and how it is regulated is underway and time is running out to make a submission.  The proposed changes to the law affect mainstream, new and emerging media.


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New producer for Māori TV

Television journalist Mihingarangi Forbes has left TV3’s current affairs show Campbell Live and moved to Māori Television to produce its daily news programme, Te Kaea. 


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Three new postgraduate journalists have been named for the annual international internships organised by the Pacific Media Centre and sponsored by the Asia New Zealand Foundation with the support of the China Daily.


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Young Pacific success

A teenage Pacific film maker has earned an international award for a film ‘Discrimination against women’.  Sixteen-year-old Nenneth Sakit produced the film in Port Vila during a workshop hosted by the Vanuatu Broadcasting and Television Corporation last year. 


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Canterbury Television and Maori Television screened the full Christchurch Earthquake Memorial Service live on both channels on 22 February. 


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Pacific Journalism Review goes online

Pacific Journalism Review has launched a new website archiving regional media research dating back almost two decades. It is a digitally enhanced site taking over from the old site established by AUT University five years ago.


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Research from Massey University into editorial items about Maori issues and the Treaty of Waitangi in 14 suburban newspapers in Auckland and Northland found a low proportion of articles despite a high number of Maori people living in these regions. 


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Maori Television’s primetime current affairs show Native Affairs saw off competitors such as TVNZ Sunday and TV3’s 60 Minutes to take the award for best current affairs series at the Aotearoa Film and Television Awards this year.


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New Asian TV Series ‘Neighbourhood’

More than $1.3 million has been allocated to a production company called Satellite Media to produce a series of shows once a week about community diversity. 


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An investigation is being carried out on broadcasting needs, wants and expectations of Pacific audiences in New Zealand. 


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Journalism professor appointed

The Auckland University of Technology’s founding director of its Pacific media centre has been appointed a professor. 


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RNZ’s Pacific Reporter on the job

Radio New Zealand’s new Pacific Issues Correspondent started last month and is based in its Auckland office. 


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Māori Radio News up for grabs

The government’s agency to fund Māori broadcasting has called for expressions of interest from media companies that can provide radio news for iwi stations around the country.


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Māori TV wins Rugby World Cup

Māori Television is winning the ratings game with its coverage of the Rugby World Cup. 


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Singing Diva on Māori TV

Māori Television is putting on a big show for the final night of the Rugby World Cup (23 Oct). 


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Decade of Pacific Media

The Pacific Islands Media Association is celebrating its tenth anniversary in New Zealand with a special dinner in Auckland next month. 


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Racist comments in online media reveal a “disturbing underbelly” in public discourse according to new research from Victoria University in Wellington, and the researchers say the response could be better “civics” education.


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New head of BSA

The Broadcasting Standards Authority has appointed a new chief executive who starts next month. 


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The New Zealand Press Association closed at the end of last month and it was a sad day for many journalists who worked there, or had affiliations with the news service that has been running for more than 100 years. 


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The National Business Review, and the now defunct NZPA, came under fire from the Press Council for being inaccurate after it received a complaint saying independent MP Hone Harawira had been misquoted. 


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Radio New Zealand has appointed a new voice to lead the way for commentating and reporting on Pacific news. 


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Fairfax has new Ethnic Correspondent

The Sunday Star Times has a new Maori and Asian affairs reporter who is also working on daily news stories for its Stuff website. 


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Canterbury’s community radio station is looking for a talented people person to host a programme every morning. 


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A sociologist says racist ‘bigots’ who used to ring talk-back are now venting their views on social media such as Facebook, twitter and auction site Trade Me. 


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The responses to last year’s controversial statements by Paul Henry and Hone Harawira will be the focus of this year’s media and diversity forum at the New Zealand Diversity Forum in Hamilton on Monday 22 August (3.30 pm – 5.00pm).


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Asia Downunder dropped by TVNZ

After nearly 20 years, Asia Downunder will broadcast its final episode at the end of the year.  Producers say the popular programme is all about Asians in New Zealand, their lives, their interests, controversies and their achievements.


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Māori TV has announced its commentary team for all 48 games, in Māori and English, during the Rugby World Cup tournament. 


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The Ministry for Culture and Heritage is calling for applications from potential radio operators and broadcasters who want to get behind the microphone in Hamilton, Tauranga and Invercargill. 


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Pacific station relocates south

Auckland’s two Pacific radio stations Niu FM and 531 pi are relocating to new studios in South Auckland. 


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Waikato Times loses Māori issues round

The Waikato Times has stopped having one journalist focusing on local Māori issues but is instead merging them with rural news. 


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Te Wiki o te Reo Māori

The Māori Language Commission is delighted about the success of Māori Language week /Te Wiki o te Reo Māori and says it gained its highest profile ever across the media, from TV and radio to internet sites and newspapers. 


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Television New Zealand’s controversial charter has been finally extinguished through a bill passed by Parliament this month.


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Radio New Zealand has ended its contract with Waatea News to provide a Māori news service to the station.


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Media focus at Diversity Forum

A multi-media study about Paul Henry and Hone Harawira is being presented by Wellington’s Centre for Applied Cross-cultural Research at next month’s 2011 New Zealand Diversity forum jointly hosted by the Human Rights Commission and the Hamilton Multicultural Services Trust.


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Happy Birthday Waiariki

The Waiariki Institute of Technology celebrated more than 25 years of its bicultural journalism course recently.


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The Journalists Training Organisation is setting up a new level 4 training course that includes reporting, ethics, internet, and media law for those who want a taste of journalism. 


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Fairfax wants new journalists

Fairfax has launched its search for journalism internships this month and is offering to reimburse their training fee at one of five selected journo schools. 


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World refugee day

Asia Downunder is broadcasting a special programme on Sunday 19 June to commemorate World Refugee Day with the theme: one refugee without hope is one too many.


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Registrations are now open for the annual New Zealand Diversity Forum, to be held in Hamilton 21-22 August at the Claudelands Convention Centre.


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Stories with attitude

That two high-profile television presenters of the show Attitude would be stopped from flying to Wellington because they didn’t have a caregiver, serves as a reminder that we have some way to go in our understanding of people living with disabilities, says the series’ producer Robyn Scott-Vincent.


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BSA on Paul Henry

The Broadcasting Standards Authority (BSA) has ordered TVNZ to broadcast a statement containing a comprehensive summary of its decision regarding Breakfast host Paul Henry’s comments on the name of an Indian Minister. It has also ruled that TVNZ to pay $3000 costs.


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BSA on “dirty Germans”

The Broadcasting Standards Authority (BSA) did not uphold a complaint that a host of Radio Live Drive, who referred to “dirty Germans”, breached standards of good taste and decency and discrimination and denigration standards.


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In defence of public broadcasting

Following an Open Letter from academics around the country on the future of public broadcasting, Victoria University is hosting a forum to discuss the issue later this month.


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Niu FM into Wellington

Earlier this month Broadcasting Minister Jonathan Coleman and Pacific Island Affairs Minister Georgina te Heuheu welcomed the opening of the new Pacific Media Network studio in Wellington, in collaboration with Whitireia Journalism School.


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Media diversity webinar

The Cities of Migration initiative webinar on diversity in the media is now available to watch on line.


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A Facebook page dedicated to Vaiaso o le Gagana Sāmoa/Samoan Language Week (1 to 7 June) has attracted fans from 18 countries all around the world, including more than 1600 people in Australia and the United States. On the page people with an interest in Samoan language share tips and advice and offer support for people keen on preserving the language.


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While Radio New Zealand (RNZ) will no longer source its Māori news bulletins from Waatea News, this will not result in less Māori news says the station’s head of news, Don Rood.


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Peace Journalism: what is it?

Rukhsana Aslam, a media educator from Pakistan and the Asian Journalism Fellow at the Pacific Media Centre (PMC) this year, will explore the concept of peace journalism and how it can be taught at a public seminar next month.


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New pan-Pacific Media Alliance

Representatives of Pacific media networks have agreed to cooperate as a regional alliance on media freedom and other issues of common concern at a conference held in Apia, Samoa, to coincide with World Press Freedom Day earlier this month.


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This year, the Bruce Jesson Journalism Award has increased the value of its main award from $3000 to $4000.


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Publish or ignore?

Newspapers around the country appeared to face a dilemma on whether or not to report on the activities of the group that calls itself the Right Wing Resistance: whether to ignore the group or give the group the publicity they were after.


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Call for journal articles

Articles are currently being sought for publication in the October 2011 edition of Pacific Journalism Review.


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Inspiring stories, inspiring change

The Inspiring Stories Project is looking for mentors experienced in storytelling to help run workshops around the North Island aimed at helping young people develop storytelling and documentary filmmaking skills.


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New radio diploma

The Whitireia Journalism School’s new Diploma in Radio Journalism was launched this month, headed by Ana Tapiata, who has more than 25 years’ experience in journalism, in both Maori and English.


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Plains FM update

Canterbury’s community access radio station, Plains FM 96.9, is back on site broadcasting to niche and ethnic communities after a five week hiatus due to its premises being situated within in the red zone of the CBD after the February earthquake.


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Radio networking

The earthquake in Christchurch highlighted the role of radio at a time when many people do not have power, as well as the benefits of being part of a radio network.


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China and Us

Chinese now constitute the third largest ethnicity in New Zealand, a fact that recently prompted the New Zealand Herald to “take a closer look at the communities we need to know better”.


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“Makings of Kaitiaki”, a 12-minute documentary made by AUT’s communications student, Sophie Johnson, will be shown at the 2011 Nepalese International Indigenous Film Festival later this month.


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Race Relations Day

Race Relations Day is on Monday 21 March.  It’s not too late to order the multilingual posters. Check out the Race Relations Day website or Facebook page to view various events happening around the country to celebrate Race Relations Day.


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“Being part of the iwi radio network is what saved us,” says Tahu FM’s station manager, Blade Jones. “It was down to a lot of goodness from other people.”


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Plains FM, almost back on air

Plains FM staff were finally able to retrieve their equipment from their building inside the cordon on 11 March, only because the station managed to persuade Civil Defence that community access radio was an essential  service. 


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Veteran broadcaster in the classroom

After two decades as a print journalist and Pacific Issues correspondent for Radio New Zealand, Richard Pamatatau is now into his first term as programme leader for the new Graduate Diploma of Pacific Journalism at AUT University in Auckland.


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International interns announced

Three AUT University media graduates have been selected for annual international internships in China and Indonesia organised by the Pacific Media Centre, with airfares sponsored by the Asia New Zealand Foundation.


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Three Auckland cinemas will screen the new release of the New Zealand made film, My Wedding and Other Secrets, with Chinese subtitles.


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Maori karaoke back on screen

Homai Te Pakipaki will return to Māori Television this month, with auditions beginning at 4.30pm on 18 March for a show that will be broadcast live later that evening.


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Following the success of the Media, Investigative Journalism and Technological (MIJT) conference at AUT University last month, the Australian Centre for Independent Journalism is hosting Australia’s first National Investigative Journalism Conference at the University of Technology, Sydney, in August.


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Kapa Haka live on the web

Māori Television viewers worldwide will be able to watch a live web simulcast of the final day of the world’s largest celebration of Māori Performing Arts on Sunday 20 February.


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Chinese gold miners in the 19th century press

The popular press of the 19th century in both Dunedin and California had a lot in common in with each other: when the Chinese gold miners were seen as crucial to economic growth they were described as law-abiding and hard-working, but when they were considered surplus to economic requirements they were described as libidinous drug addicts.


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Race Relations Commissioner Joris de Bres congratulated Aucklander reporter Joanna Davies in person for her portfolio of stories that won her equal runner up in the annual Excellence in Reporting Diversity Awards.


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Kiwi-Asian journalism scholarship awarded

A young Fijian-Indian New Zealander with a degree in biomedical science has been awarded this year’s Asia New Zealand Foundation (Asia; NZ) Kiwi Asian Journalism Scholarship. Massey University journalism student, Clarissa Chandrahasen, is of Fijian-Indian heritage and comes from Kelson in Lower Hutt.


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A speech inspired by broadcaster Paul Henry’s comments on whether the Governor General was a “real” New Zealander led Massey University student, Ani Tylee, to win a Pro-Chancellor prizes in Speech Writing.


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Two more off to Asia

Two young New Zealand journalists have been awarded Asia: NZ media scholarships to undertake media internships at two respected Asia-based media organisations later this year.


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Travel Grant deadlines

Asia: NZ has announced the deadlines for this year’s Media Travel Grants. Each year, Asia: NZ’s media programme offers New Zealand journalists the chance to travel to different parts of Asia to research and prepare stories.


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Marlborough media have set a high standard for media support for multicultural activities in the lead-up to Race Relations Day on 21 March. This year’s theme is People in Harmony.


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NZ On Air has established a second Maori Innovation fund of $1 million. This is for the creation of innovative, primetime Maori television programmes that appeal to a broad audience on a mainstream, free to air broadcaster.


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Each year the Human Rights Commission includes a section on the media in its Race Relations Report. We now welcome your comments on the draft chapter. Please send any feedback to nzdiversity@hrc.co.nz by Sunday 30 January. What do you think were the most important developments last year? What are the priorities for 2010?


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Defamation suit ends Korean newspaper

Auckland’s longest-running Korean-language newspaper has folded after an 18-year run, following a High Court order to pay $250,000 in defamation damages to a prominent Korean businessman, according to an article in the New Zealand Herald.
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The Human Rights Commission is currently drafting its annual review of diversity and the media for inclusion in the 2010 Race Relations Report, due to be published in March. Do you have some news or views as to what should be included? Please send your thoughts and reports to nzdiversity@hrc.co.nz

Excellence in diversity

The story of a journey from a Himalayan refugee camp to inner city Christchurch has won Christchurch Press reporter, Rebecca Todd, the 2010 Excellence in Reporting Diversity Award.
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Sing-and-win, Māori style

How did a karaoke show become the most popular locally produced series to have appeared on Māori Television?
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Radio: a global perspective

The role of radio in the modern world will be the focus of discussion and debate at the Radio Conference: A Transnational Forum, to be held at the Auckland University of Technology in January.
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How the news sees immigrants

The representation of immigrant communities is considerably better than it used to be, say two leading New Zealand researchers.
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The BSA has declined to uphold a viewer’s complaint about Paul Henry, in which the former broadcaster expressed his frustration with slow drivers, particularly Asian drivers. The case highlights the fine line between what constitutes freedom of expression and what is considered acceptable.


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The next report to the UN on the state of New Zealand’s race relations is due in December, 2011. The Government takes on the job of submitting the report to the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination every five years.


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More guest speakers and conference details have been confirmed for the inaugural Media, Investigative Journalism and Technology Conference to be held at the Auckland University of Technology in early December.


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Radio Tarana’s Fiji Festival has become so popular that this month’s celebrations will take place over two days instead of one.  Even though the festival is now held twice a year, that is no longer enough to accommodate the numbers of visitors.


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Māori whakapapa search seeks subjects

Bravestar Films are looking for Māori of all ages to be part of the seventh series of Tātai Hono, due to run on Māori Television next year.  The television series revolves around helping Māori who have lost touch with their family and tribal affiliations reconnect with their people and their home ground.


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The Maori Language awards were presented in Rotorua last Saturday 9 October. 


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Time for a Pacific television channel

The Pacific Islands Media Association (PIMA) has established a new “Pasifika film and television” working group.


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Award winning access radio

The programme coordinator for Plains FM 96.9, one of 13 organisations to receive a Diversity Award from the Human Rights Commission this year, says she may have never got into broadcasting career if it were not for access radio.


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Journalist interns to Asia

Asia: New Zealand is giving young journalists another chance to get a three-month internship at either the Philippine Star in Manila, CNBC Asia in Singapore or the International Herald Tribune in Hong Kong.


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There’s still time to enter the Excellence in Reporting Diversity Awards. The awards aim to recognise the work of journalists with less than five year’s experience reporting on Asia-related topics.


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BSA on freedom of expression

The Broadcasting Standards Authority (BSA) wants to hear from its stakeholders, including the general public, for a study exploring issues relating to freedom of expression in New Zealand.


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The tension between freedom of expression and notions of social harm has also been explored in the Commission’s draft document, Human Rights in New Zealand Today, an updated version of its first status report published in 2004.


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A complaint about an item on television programme, Sunday, which investigated child marriages has not been upheld by the Broadcasting Standards Authority (BSA).


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Diversity Forum on Asia Downunder

This weekend the television series Asia Downunder will feature an item on the Diversity Forum hosted by the Human Rights Commission at Christchurch in August this year. 


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The last ten days have seen a lot of public and media discussion on broadcasting standards and racially offensive comments.After a flood of over 600 complaints to Television New Zealand about Paul Henry’s remarks about the Governor General and TVNZ’s initial defence of him, Paul Henry resigned from his position as host of TVNZ’s Breakfast and TVNZ said his comments were unacceptable.


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Beyond J-Pop

Tokyo is an uber-urban metropolis generally associated with the tech-savvy and fashionably styled but, as New Zealand music journalist Sam Wicks discovered, it is also the centre of a rich alternative music scene.
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QBook in Te Reo Māori

One of the country’s most well loved children’s stories and songs, One Day a Taniwha, is now being sold in Apple’s iTune stores around the world.
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Kiwi Asian Journalism Scholarship

The Asia New Zealand Foundation (Asia:NZ) is offering an annual scholarship as a way of attracting more Asian New Zealanders into journalism.
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Media awards at Huia Te Reo

The annual Huia Te Reo, Māori Language Expo will announce the winners of the Broadcasting categories on 9 October at a function at the Energy Events Centre, Government Gardens, Rotorua.
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Diversity awards offer top prize

There’s still time to enter the Excellence in Reporting Diversity Awards. The awards aim to recognise the work of journalists with less than five year’s experience reporting on Asia-related topics.
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Controversy sparked by TVNZ Sunday programme

The Waikato Somali Friendship Society held a public meeting in Hamilton on 3 September for the community to express their concerns about an item Chewing the khat featured on TVNZ’s Sunday programme on 22 August.
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Māori arts prime time winner

The eighth series of the flagship Māori Televisions art show, Kete Arohui, will begin screening on September 19 proving that, contrary to popular perception, arts programmes can sustain a prime time television spot.
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Broadcasting funding agency NZ On Air is providing $500,000 to fund a pilot service called audio description that will allow people with impaired vision to follow television programmes more easily.


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Join Captioned Movies NZ on Facebook

The new Captioned Movies NZ facebook page has attracted 90 members in its first week. Captioned Movies NZ supports the deaf and hearing-impaired by providing movies with captions that screen in mainstream cinemas in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch.


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Practitioners, journalists, academics, researchers and students who work in the creative industries are invited to participate in a Fourth Estate “conversation” at the inaugural Media, Investigative Journalism and Technology Conference in Auckland in December 2010.


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Media representation of ethnic, sexual and gender diversity will be debated at the human rights conference to be held at the Asia Pacific OutGames in March 2011 in Wellington.


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Sue Abel, senior lecturer in the departments of Māori Studies and Film, Television and Media Studies at Auckland University, has delivered a lecture on the lack of Māori voices in mainstream news bulletins. A transcript of this lecture, “A question of balance”, has now been published in the NZ Herald and can be read online.

Registration is still open for the annual New Zealand Diversity Forum, to be held in Christchurch from 22-23 August. Check out the programme and register online now!


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This year’s Excellence in Reporting Diversity Awards aims to reward the work of young journalists who meet high standards of journalism while reporting on Asian affairs.


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Auckland University of Technology’s Club PR and Amnesty International held a charity debate at the University this month with the theme “Human rights in the New Zealand media”.


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Te Wiki o te Reo Māori is just around the corner, and there will be many exciting events to report on this year. The launch, on Monday 26 July, will feature a lunch-time celebrity cook-off at Midland Park in Wellington.


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Next year Auckland University of Technology’s (AUT) School of Communications will offer a new Graduate Diploma in Pacific Journalism, a programme spearheaded by Pacific Media Centre director Dr David Robie.


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The Pacific Cooperation Foundation is once again running its Media Assistance Programme, which provides financial assistance to New Zealand based journalists – covering airfares, accommodation and ground transport – so that they can travel to the heart of a story in the Pacific.


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The Whitireia Community Polytechnic Journalism programme has set up a new scholarship for international students from ethnic groups that are under-represented in the news media.


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A new series, screening on Māori Television, showcases century-old film footage from the New Zealand Film Archive’s Taonga Māori Collection. In the 26-part series Ngā Taonga Whitiāhua, special guests explain the background of the people and the events that feature on screen, with footage dating back to 1901.


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Apply to be a Fairfax intern

Fairfax Media, New Zealand’s largest newspaper, magazine and web publisher, is again seeking the country’s brightest prospects for its journalism intern scheme for 2011.


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Professor Paul Morris from Victoria University and Jim Tully from the University of Canterbury will discuss a proposed Statement on Religion and the Media at this year’s Religious Diversity Forum. However, before the forum, we would like to hear your thoughts and suggestions on the subject.


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Young refugees tell their stories

Five young people with refugee backgrounds were recently given the chance to create, produce and develop their own radio dramas that are being broadcast on Radio New Zealand National in celebration of World Refugee Day 2010.


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Samoan journalist and NZ Herald reporter, Vaimoana Tapaleao, has won the Junior Reporter of the Year at the 37th annual Qantas Media Awards held in Auckland earlier this month.


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Time to fund better ethnic media?

Labour Associate Ethnic Affairs spokesperson Ashraf Choudhary has proposed a Member’s Bill, the Ethnic Broadcasting Commission Bill, as a way to ensure that New Zealand provides multilingual and multicultural television services that reflect our diverse society.


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Getting used to it

It’s not unusual for linguistic change to provoke a backlash, but recent history suggests that people eventually do adjust to progress. Remember when Radio New Zealand (RNZ) surprised the nation during Māori Language Week in 2007, by using extended Māori in the introduction and closing of its programmes, and broadcasters such as Geoff, Sean and Katrina suddenly revealed a new level of fluency in te reo?


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Māori Language Week 2010

This year Māori Language Week runs from 26 July-1 August with the theme ‘Te Mahi Kai, The Language of Food’. You can find out more on the Kōrero Māori and the Human Rights Commission websites and the Maori Language Week Facebook page.

Story telling as a long-term project

Two recipients of the Asia: NZ media programme have been able to travel to Nepal to research Bhutanese people living in refugee camps in Nepal.


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Where have all the shamans gone?

A TV3 item last month, which reported on the growing levels of advertisements for supernatural services in the ethnic media, seems to have driven most of the self-styled gurus, shamans, astrologers and talismans underground.


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The New Zealand Diversity Forum will be held at the Christchurch Convention Centre, 22-23 August. The theme is ‘It’s About Us’. Two sessions have relevance to the media.


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Making sense of civil rights

One of New Zealand’s foremost human right lawyers, Tim McBride, has cut through the impenetrable legalese surrounding New Zealand law and produced an accessible and authoritative guide to our civil liberties, the New Zealand Civil Rights Handbook.


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TV3 News in Mandarin

TV3 News has launched an innovative service aimed at New Zealand’s Chinese community. Since April, a daily selection of stories on the network’s website is translated into Mandarin and posted on the 3 News website.


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Samoan Language Week

Samoan Language Week will take place from Sunday 30 May to Saturday 5 June 2010, with the theme ‘O la Tātou Gagana Sāmoa i Niu Sila – Our Samoan language in New Zealand’. Samoan is the third most spoken language in Aotearoa, after English and Māori.


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Kaitangata Twitch goes global

Kaitangata Twitch, the 13-part drama based on a Margaret Mahy novel and the most significant drama ever commissioned by Māori Television continues to attract offshore audiences as well as international awards.


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Beyond Bollywood

Nobody said that making movies was easy, but getting funding, if you are an unknown director, is almost impossible. This has not stopped Sapna Samant from making her first movie, which, according to the trailer, was made with “love, passion and a zero budget”.


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Māori Television breaks 2m mark

More than two million people tuned to Māori Television in April, the best ratings for the channel since it first went to air in April 2004, when it attracted a cumulative audience of 300,000 in its first month.


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Around 40 Radio New Zealand and Radio New Zealand International staff gathered at a service at the end of April to farewell their former colleague, Elma MaUa, one of the country’s pioneer Pacific broadcasters, who died aged 61 after a long struggle with cancer.


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New Chinese television station

This month a new Chinese television station has begun trial broadcasting on a Freeview, digital free-to-air channel. Channel 33 is the brainchild of Stephen Wong, former owner of the Chinese Herald, a publication he sold four years ago.


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Ethnic Media Workshop

Journalists working in the ethnic media are invited to a workshop to get a comprehensive introduction to New Zealand media conventions, learn about travel opportunities for those working in either the ethnic media or promoting ethnic issues in the mainstream media, and discuss issues involving ethnic communities and mainstream media.


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Three New Zealand journalists were among a group of 56 from across East Asia and Australasia attending an East Asia Regional Media Programme in Jakarta, Indonesia last month.


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The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights is seeking applications for its 2011 Minority Fellowship Programme.


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Recent BSA and ASA decisions

The following decisions were made by the Advertising Standards Authority and the Broadcasting Standards Authority in March.


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Mainstream media are being urged by the Association of Samoan Language Teachers and the Human Rights Commission to promote the Samoan language and the Samoan community in Samoan Language Week from 30 May to 5 June.


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The Indian Weekender is publishing a “mega issue” this week to celebrate its first anniversary.


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A new English weekly newspaper is to be launched by the publishers of Auckland’s newest Chinese newspaper, the United Chinese Press of Lianhe Bao.


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Strategic Policy Manager position

A vacancy has arisen for the position of Strategic Policy Manager within the Human Rights Commission’s senior management team. A job description is available on the Commission’s website (applications close April 2).

On 30 March Fairfax Newspapers in Education will publish a resource that has a topic that complements New Zealand Sign Language Week.


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News from The People’s Daily (人民日Rénmín Rìbào), China’s official newspaper, is now being circulated in New Zealand through an Auckland-based Chinese newspaper.


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The leadership of a global indigenous broadcasters group was handed to the Taiwan Indigenous Television by Māori TV at the second World Indigenous Television Broadcasting Conference in Taiwan last week.


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Recent BSA and ASA decisions

The Broadcasting Standards Authority and the Advertising Standards Authority made the following decisions in February and March this year.


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Race Relations Day

Race Relations Day is being held on March 21 and this year’s theme is ‘It’s About Us’.


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Facebook page for latest on race relations

The Human Rights Commission is getting into online social media Facebook to get discussions going ahead of Race Relations Day next month.


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Corazon Miller, a young Filipina-Kiwi has been awarded the first Asia New Zealand Foundation Kiwi Asian Journalism Scholarship.


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Stories wanted for the Asian Radio Show

The Asian Radio Show is seeking ideas for 2-3 minute stories for the 2010 season series, which runs until June 12.


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There will be more “cultural festival weeks” following the success of the Jilin Cultural Week on Triangle Television, says the Pacific Culture and Arts Exchange Centre.


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Auckland’s 110,000-strong Chinese population will be getting an even wider choice of news with the launch of a new Chinese newspaper this month.


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An Indian community newspaper is questioning the unity of local Indians after community leaders decided to have two separate celebrations to observe the Diamond Jubilee Celebrations of India’s Republic Day.


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The Rotorua Indian community is still in a state of shock over the sudden death of their community leader. Kishorbhai Morarji, Bay of Plenty Rotorua Indian Association President and editor of the local community newsletter, died in a car accident on 30 January.


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Coming up at the Pacific Media Centre

AUT University’s Pacific Media Centre will be having a busy year ahead.


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The media chapter in the Race Relations Commissioner’s annual review of race relations for 2009 shows that media and advertising industries continue to receive low numbers of complaints in the way they depict or report on race relations issues.


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Annual review of media and diversity

Each year the Human Rights Commission includes a section on media and diversity in its Race Relations Report. A draft of this section is available for comment. Please send any feedback to nzdiversity@hrc.co.nz . What do you think were the most important developments last year? What are the priorities for 2010?


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The New Zealand Police arer enlisting the help of Auckland-based Chinese media to help in its fight to stop the import of ContactNT, a pseudoephedrine-based drug that is imported from China.


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TV1 journalist Adrian Stevanon may have been called a “slow learner” by the Samoan Prime Minister – but his piece about Samoa has won him a top award.


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New Zealand media are being encouraged to open up a wider dialogue on human rights through a new media network launched by Amnesty International Aotearoa New Zealand.


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Communities in their own words

A new Television One documentary series, Minority Voices, will give new New Zealanders a chance to introduce themselves to the wider community in their own words, its producers say.


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Mao the blogger

Well-known Chinese blogger Isaac Mao is visiting Auckland this Sunday and Monday (Oct 18 – 19).
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Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori (The Māori Language Commission) supports the bid by Māori Television to broadcast the Rugby World Cup as a test of national consciousness and attitudes to the Māori language.
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Asian newspapers, online news publishers and radio stations went into full swing in efforts to find the lost toddler Aisling Symes after police said one of her last sightings was with an Asian woman.
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Radio New Zealand’s Mediawatch programme looked at the value news organisations gained from more diverse newsrooms in their reporting of the tsunami tragedy in Samoa this month.
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A Massey University sociologist, Professor Paul Spoonley has been awarded a Royal Society of New Zealand Science and Technology medal for his scholarship on race relations in New Zealand

The regional director (Albany) and research director for the College of Humanities and Social Sciences says the award is a ‘tremendous honour’.
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Hindus are urging director James Cameron to exercise care in handling Hindu concepts and terminology ahead of the screening of Wellington-made Hollywood movie “Avatar”.
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Indian Newslink, a fortnightly Indian community newspaper, is co-coordinating efforts to find a missing Indian student in Auckland.
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Top Korean drama for Triangle

The Korean community is hoping that a top rating Korean drama series to screen on Triangle Television from this weekend will make Kiwis more aware of Korean culture.
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Cinemas look to Asian market

Entertainment giant Skycity Cinema says it will be increasing its focus on the Asian market, and promotions through Asian media, after a state-funded film about China’s communist revolution topped its ratings.
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News agency visits

Representatives from Chinese news agency, China News Service, are in Auckland this week to meet local Chinese media editors. Agency chief editor Xing Haofeng said the trip was to better understand the needs of Auckland-based Chinese newspapers and the type of news from China they wanted.

Kan gives up column

Former Chinese newspaper columnist Simon Kan says he will no longer be writing his columns to concentrate on politics. Mr Kan, who stood and lost in Botany at the last election, says his focus will be helping the Kiwi Party win parliamentary seats in the next election. He is the vice president of the party.

Parihaka Day at Plains

Plains FM 96.9 will be broadcasting two programmes focusing on justice and human rights.
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Violet Cho, the inaugural Asian Journalism Fellow at AUT University’s Pacific Media Centre, has visited Wellington for several meetings with non-government advocates and for a public talk at Victoria University of Wellington.
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Pacific.Scoop, a partnership between AUT University’s Pacific Media Centre and Scoop Media, was launched at last month’s Māori Expo in Auckland.


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Facebook page for NZDAP

The New Zealand Diversity Action Programme now has a Facebook page. You can read news and other information on the new Facebook page.

Entries open for diversity reporting award

Instead of bagging the media about diversity, critics are being encouraged to celebrate good diversity reporting published by New Zealand media outlets.


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Punjabi TV to hit NZ screens

Local South Asian television channel service, Vision Asia, is set to bring Punjabi Television to New Zealand screens later this month.


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Isaac Mao, labelled as China’s “first blogger” by Britain’s Guardian newspaper, will be in New Zealand next month to speak on web journalism and new media.


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How the press depicted Chinese gold miners

A senior Massey University lecturer will be looking into how Chinese gold miners were depicted in the American West Coast press of the 19th century.


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An Indian community newspaper chief is challenging mainstream media to make better use of skilled but marginalised ethnic minority journalists in New Zealand.


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Skykiwi.com zooming in on China

New Zealand’s leading Chinese online forum skykiwi.com is shifting its focus to the lucrative China market, and will be adding New Zealand immigration and education channels on its site to attract Chinese traffic.


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Christchurch-based journalist Amanda Cropp has been awarded the Mental Health Foundation category one journalism grant for her work on mental health issues.


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Get a great OE to South Asia

A media travel grant is being offered to reporters keen to get a “South Asian OE”. India, the world’s biggest democracy, celebrates its 62nd anniversary of independence on 15 August.
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Diplomats representing China have requested a meeting with Māori Television over plans by the channel to screen a documentary about a Uighur activist Beijing has accused of inciting ethnic riots.
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A new scholarship is being launched to attract Asian New Zealanders into journalism. The Asia New Zealand Foundation is offering to pay up to $5000 on completion of a successful candidate’s course of journalism study for the 2010 calendar year.
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Pacific Radio Trust names new chief

The National Pacific Radio Trust, which runs the nationwide NiuFM radio network and Radio 531PI, has named veteran broadcaster Tom Etuata, 43, as its new chief. Etuata has 12 years’ industry experience working in the Pacific region and New Zealand.
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Among initiatives launched for Islam Awareness Week is an online Muslim women’s directory and the publication of a book, titled Crescent Moon: The Asian Face of Islam in New Zealand by the Asia New Zealand Foundation. The directory brings together 26 Muslim organisations for women in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch.

Ethnic Affairs Minister Pansy Wong said, “The Muslim faith spans across more than 40 different ethnic communities in New Zealand. The online directory is a way for these communities to work together to achieve their goals.”

New Zealand’s media need to run more positive Muslim stories to dispel the myth that all followers of Islam are terrorists, says a prominent New Zealand Muslim leader.
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Participants at the New Zealand Diversity Forum will be getting an insight into Asian media, which serves an audience of a quarter of a million.
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Return of the Bananas

New Zealand’s Chinese communities meet this weekend (July 18 and 19) for an annual event that challenges perceptions of what it means to be Chinese at The University of Auckland Business School.


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New media, new audiences

The Human Rights Commission is chairing a panel at the New Zealand Diversity Forum in August that will provide insights into the Asian media channels serving an audience of a quarter million.


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Diversity journalism awards back again

An award for best reporting of diversity stories will be launched again next month at the New Zealand Diversity Forum in Wellington. The inaugural awards last year attracted about 25 entries from television, radio and newspapers around the country.


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Tongan advisory chairman Melino Maka has criticised mainstream media reports of an alleged visa scam last month, Pacific Media Watch reported.


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In search of diversity in reporting

Journalist Adrian Chang said the internship programme Fairfax media had given him a “great start” to his professional development. Through the programme, journalism students of Māori, Pacific Island and Asian backgrounds who have signed on as interns have gone on to do great things within the company and beyond.


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A new television programme, aimed at keeping Koreans informed on New Zealand ways, has started screening on Triangle television and Sky TV.


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Minister for Ethnic Affairs Pansy Wong says the media’s use of words like “Asian” or “African” or “Indian” in stories gives the impression that one person of that ethnicity is speaking on behalf of their entire community.


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Community mourns death of its spokesman

The local Sri Lankan community is mourning the death of a man many regard as a spokesman for the community. Dr Upali Manukulasurya, better known to many as Dr Manu, passed away on Sunday July 12 in Auckland.


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This Week: World Refugee Day

Radio New Zealand are featuring a series of dramatised stories from the experiences of former refugees this week.


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New Zealand broadcasters have been urged to rise to the challenge of meeting the needs of a more diverse audience.


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The annual media forum at the New Zealand Diversity Forum on August 24 will focus on Asian Media in New Zealand.


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New Zealand’s newest Indian print fortnightly has launched its online edition www.indianweekender.co.nz


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TU MAI Magazine Adds KOHA

TU MAI, the 10-year-old indigenous magazine, is to add a hard copy version of the recently launched online magazine KOHA to its pages.


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The community radio service in New Zealand is not adequately funded, says Auckland Access Radio Service Broadcast Manager Terri Byrne.


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A report on new migrants in Southland and the local government’s struggles to educate the wider community about the importance of welcoming them to the province has taken second place in a journalism award.


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AUT University’s School of Communication Studies has announced that it will be offering the first Graduate Diploma in Pacific Journalism programme next year.


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An international indigenous current affairs series and programme exchange initiative will be launched by the World Indigenous Television Broadcasters Network (WITBN).


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Chinese newspapers in New Zealand help the diverse Chinese communities here maintain their cultural identity and adapt to a new environment, a study has found.


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Māori Language Week is from July 27 to August 2, and this year’s theme is Te Reo i te Hapori: Māori Language in the Community.


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The BSA has released a new paper entitled Māori Worldviews and Broadcasting Standards: What Should be the Relationship? to provide a platform for discussion of the relationship between broadcasting standards and Māori worldviews and interests.


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The little station that could

Canterbury’s little community access station Plains FM 96.9 scooped a NZ Radio Award for the fourth year running at this year’s New Zealand Radio Awards. Naoko Kudo won the award for Best Spoken/Informational Programme in Any Language for Japanese Downunder which she has produced and presented since 2002.


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The Māori Television Service Act has been reviewed and the broadcaster says it is welcoming the results of a review into its legislation. The review by independent panel, Te Kāhui o Māhutonga, covered the operation and effectiveness of the Māori Television Service (Te Aratuku Whakaata Irirangi Māori) Act 2003.


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Ethnic radio station makes history

In one of the more dramatic results in New Zealand’s radio history independent Radio Tarana, aimed at the Auckland Indian community, was among the top 10 radio stations in the greater Auckland region.


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With increasing Chinese and Korean student numbers, Japanese monthly E-Cube – a glossy magazine targetting international students – has gone multilingual.


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Experienced newsmen helm New Zealand’s new national Indian weekly – the Indian Weekender. The weekly, published by Kiwi Media Group, aimed at an increasingly competitive market of about 120,000 Indians in New Zealand, will be challenging the long-established Indian Newslink.


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The Pacific Island Media Association of New Zealand (PIMA) is left without a chief after its chairman Aaron Taouma announced his resignation last week. PIMA was formed in 2001 by Pacific Island television and radio broadcasters, newspaper publishers and journalists, film makers and media students based here.


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The brand new Polyfest 2009 series is about to hit the screens of the nation on Saturdays at 9.30am on TV2 for five weeks. Here’s the run down of the hosts and the Pasifika cultures featured in the series.


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Asia Downunder staff are delighted with their new timeslot on Saturday mornings on TV One. Bharat Jamnadas, who has been with the company since it started says he is hopeful that the programme will attract more mainstream viewers after being moved from its usual Sunday morning 8.30am slot to 10.30am on TV One last month.


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Samoan language and culture will be celebrated during Samoan Language Week from Sunday 24 May to Sunday 31 May, immediately before Samoa Independence Day on 1 June.


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Media organisations are facing tough times in the current economic climate, but the editor of New Zealand’s longest-running newspaper sees it as a time of opportunity.


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A series of fairs and expos is being organised by local ethnic newspaper publisher Migrant News, with the aim to help migrant settlement in their adopted country.
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Free-to-air community television Triangle Television has ceased transmission in Wellington since the start of this month because of a lack of money.


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Journalism grads head East

Four new Kiwi journalism graduates will be heading East for internships with newspapers in Asia.


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Fiji-born reporter Dominika White, who says she has a passion to be the “voice for the voiceless”, has won the Māori Television Prize and AUT University Pacific Media Centre Storyboard Award for diversity journalism for her articles in Spasifik magazine.


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