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Newsletters > Diversity Action Programme > Te Waka Reo: National Language Policy > 2010 > September

Te Waka Reo: National Language Policy

ISSN 1178-0967 September, 2010

News & Issues

Christchurch earthquake emergency lines are now connected to Language Line, the Office of Ethnic Affairs telephone service with interpreters in 40 different languages. Continue reading…

There are three numbers people can ring for help. They are:

  • Government Help Line 0800 779 997 for issues involving any Government department including those around Work and Income and Child, Youth and Family
  • The Christchurch City Council public information helpline 03 941 8999 or 03 941 7373. Language Line was made available on these numbers following the earthquake for any enquiries.

For new parents who speak little or no English, it’s good to hear that Plunket has now joined Language Line. This means they can talk to their Plunket nurse and find out more about information and services to do with their new baby. The Plunket nurse is a familiar part of the baby landscape and people can also get information about vaccination schedules, baby car seat rentals and much more. Continue reading…

People who want more information about the languages and agencies of Language Line can go to www.languageline.govt.nz

Missed out on the Diversity Forum, but are interested in the topics discussed? View or download the Forum presentations here. Continue reading…

For example, the presentation from the Interpreting in the Health Sector session is available at http://www.slideshare.net/nzhumanrights/interpreting-in-the-health-sector.

The play Resolve premieres at BATs Theatre in Wellington on 21 September and runs until 2 October 2010. It uses life stories and personal experiences of the Deaf and hearing communities and will be performed using movement, facial expressions and gestures without the use of spoken English or New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL). Continue reading…

An ensemble cast of both Deaf and hearing actors combine the visual elements of film footage, stage and costume design, in order to challenge the boundaries of communication to create sound that you can see, feel and hear. For more information visit www.bats.co.nz or email book@bats.co.nz.

The Health and Disability Commission (HDC) has published a Greek language translation of the Code of Patient Rights which can be viewed on the HDC website. According to the Hellenic Congress of New Zealand it’s believed be the first official document in New Zealand translated into Greek. Access the Code of Patient Rights in thirty different languages by visiting http://www.hdc.org.nz/.

and Disability Commission (HDC) has published a Greek language translation of the Code of Patient Rights which can be viewed on the HDC website. According to the Hellenic Congress of New Zealand it's believed be the first official document in New Zealand translated into Greek. Access the Code of Patient Rights in thirty different languages by visiting http://www.hdc.org.nz/.

Te Ataarangi teaching group chair Rahera Shortland, a veteran teacher of te reo Māori, says the time is right to introduce compulsory Māori language into the school curriculum. Ms Shortland started the first Māori immersion class in a mainstream school at Auckland Girls Grammar, and says developments such as Māori language week have paved the way for wider acceptance. Continue reading…

"I think there's more tolerance towards the language (now)," says Ms Shortland. "The main barrier to rolling out compulsory Māori would be finding enough teachers."

A survey of 500 people by Research New Zealand has found that 38 per cent of New Zealanders support the idea of teaching te reo Māori in schools becoming compulsory. The support for compulsory teaching of te reo Māori in schools is highest among those in the 15-34 year age group at 50 per cent, and lowest among those in the age group 55 years and over, at 24 per cent.

More females than males support the idea (42 per cent as against 35 per cent). Only four per cent of respondents could not make up their minds and answered 'don't know'.

Not surprisingly, the support for compulsory teaching of te reo Māori in schools was highest among Māori and Pacific People at 71 percent, compared with 32 per cent for New Zealand Europeans.

There was no difference of note by area, which shows that the support for the compulsory teaching of te reo Māori in schools is national rather than regional. Read the results of the survey and accompanying media release here.

Environment Canterbury Commissioners formally endorsed the dual use of Māori place names with their European equivalent by the regional council at their public meeting in August. Continue reading…

"The use of Māori names enables Environment Canterbury to meet its requirements as agreed in the Ngāi Tahu Deed of Settlement (1997) and the Ngāi Tahu Claims Settlement Act (1998) and recognises the value of Environment Canterbury's relationship with Ngāi Tahu as tangata whenua," said Commissioner Donald Couch.

"These Māori place names are a symbol of Ngāi Tahu's relationship with the landscape. It serves as a daily reminder of our history in Te Wai Pounamu (the South Island) as tangata whenua," he said.

Environment Canterbury has used dual Māori/European place names for many years, but had not formally endorsed its agreement to do so at council level. Read the full article including the list of dual names here.

Following a review of scholarship subjects in 2010, the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA) announced on 7 September that the Samoan Language will be examined as a Scholarship subject from 2011. Read the full media release here.

review of scholarship subjects in 2010, the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA) announced on 7 September that the Samoan Language will be examined as a Scholarship subject from 2011. Read the full media release here.

South Island Guidebook published in Korean

The Korean Society of Christchurch has published a New Zealand South Island Guidebook in the Korean language which includes settlement information and a business directory. Contact the Korean Society if your community group or organisation would like a free copy to pass on to Korean migrants or visitors. Continue reading…

Please phone the Korean Society on 03 348 2766 or email your organisation's name, phone number and postal address to chchkorean@gmail.com.

Canterbury College is offering free places for those wanting to learn English or improve their reading and writing skills. These places are open for those who have permanent residency or New Zealand citizenship. There are full-time and part-time courses available (full- time is 9-12 and 1-3pm /part-time is either mornings or afternoons). Continue reading…

The classes are available from now until the end of the year for those aged 16 years and over. These classes would suit recent arrivals or those who want to improve their reading and writing. For further information contact Terisa Tagicakibau at Terisa.Tagicakibau@mpia.govt.nz

Māori Affairs Minister Dr Pita Sharples says the real purpose of a value-for-money review of government expenditure on Māori language promotion is to ensure the survival of Māori language. Continue reading…

In a speech on 1 September to a national language conference at the Beehive, delivered entirely in te reo Māori, Dr Sharples said the most successful programmes for revitalising te reo Māori, such as kohanga reo and kura kaupapa Māori, had come from the people themselves. However, he said, once they became accountable to government, people complained that some of the strength of the programmes was lost.

In kaupapa Māori education, he said, staff were burdened down with regulatory requirements, there were not enough fluent and trained staff, and teacher training programmes saw kaupapa Māori schools as simply translating a mainstream curriculum into English.

Dr Sharples said these were the reasons he initiated a review of the whole Māori language strategy and sector: to ensure that the money spent on language promotion was getting the best possible outcomes for the language.

He said he had told the review panel to leave no stone unturned in their search for the best ways to ensure the survival of Māori language. And he urged everyone involved in Māori language revitalisation to talk to the review panel on the issues they saw, and the solutions they proposed.

Dr Sharples told the hui the Cabinet supported the review, because Ministers are aware of the difficult decisions that must be made when kaupapa Māori are accountable for government funding. He said he looked forward to taking the review report back to Cabinet with recommendations from Māori people about how the future of te reo Māori can be secured.

Teacher Professional Development Languages Years 7 to 10 (TPDL) is a year-long programme funded by the Ministry of Education. TPDL assists both existing and new teachers of languages improve their language and culture knowledge and apply pedagogy that has a real and positive impact on student learning. Teachers can gain internationally recognised language qualifications as well as accreditation in language teaching through this programme. Continue reading…

Up to 60 places are available for teachers of Chinese, French, German, Japanese and Spanish and up to 20 places for teachers of Cook Islands Maori, Niuean, Samoan, Tongan and Tokelauan. More than one teacher per school may apply. Applications for 2011 are due on 30 November 2010.

For enquiries and applications contact: TPDL Project Director Wendy Thomson w.thomson@auckland.ac.nz or 09 623 8899 ext 46310.

Download a brochure about TPDL here.

Future Events

AKTESOL Grammar Workshop 15 September

University of Auckland senior lecturer Barbara Matthews will conduct a short workshop on language analysis for teachers on 15 September. Continue reading…

The workshop will cover the following areas:

  • Why do we need grammar?
  • How do you teach it without turning students right off?
  • What teacher knowledge do you need and how would you use it?
  • As language keeps changing, is grammar a form of gatekeeping?

The evening will begin at 6.00 pm with refreshments, and the workshop will begin at 6.30 pm. The venue is Kohia Teachers' Centre, Faculty of Education, University of Auckland (Epsom Avenue, Gate 2). The event is free for AKTESOL members, and $10 for non-members. For catering purposes, please RSVP to m.jeurissen@auckland.ac.nz

Read the September issue of the AKTESOL newsletter here.

CLESOL 2010 conference

The Community Languages and English for Speakers of Other Languages (CLESOL) 2010 conference will be held 1-4 October 2010 at King’s High School in Dunedin. The theme of the conference is Context and Communication: Mediating Language Learning, Te Horopaki me te Tuku: He Rongoā i te Ako Reo.

For registrations of interest, sponsorship and other enquiries email: clesol@paardekooper.co.nz or visit www.clesol.org.nz

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The Community Languages and English for Speakers of Other Languages (CLESOL) 2010 conference will be held 1-4 October 2010 at King's High School in Dunedin. The theme of the conference is Context and Communication: Mediating Language Learning, Te Horopaki me te Tuku: He Rongoā i te Ako Reo.

For registrations of interest, sponsorship and other enquiries email: clesol@paardekooper.co.nz or visit www.clesol.org.nz

The Te Marautanga o Aotearoa training course, run by the Teachers’ Refresher Course Committee (TRCC), will be held on 2-6 October 2010 at St Margaret’s College & Camelot Motor Inn, Christchurch. Continue reading…

The course provides an opportunity for level 1 and level 2 reo Māori teachers, classes and kura to iron out the wrinkles before final implementation in 2011; discuss Graduate Profiles, whānau engagement strategies and successes; share questions, findings and issues about both Te Marautanga o Aotearoa and Ngā Whanaketanga, with writers, trial facilitators and your colleagues; and engage with Regional Facilitators and resource teachers.

Registrations have now closed but you can find out more by emailing info@trcc.org.nz.

Huia Te Reo – Māori Language Expo 2010

In 2010, the Māori Language Expo will take place from 8-9 October at the Energy Events Centre in Rotorua. Continue reading…

Huia Te Reo will have a particular emphasis on improved and sustainable reo Māori usage. The event will include a one-day symposium, one-day expo and an awards dinner.

For information updates, visit the www.korero.maori.nz website.

Samoan Language Week 2011 dates announced

The dates for next year’s Samoan Language Week/Vaiaso o le Gagana Sāmoa have just been announced. In 2011, the week will run from Sunday 29 May to Saturday 4 June to again coincide with Samoan Independence Day on 1 June.

or next year's Samoan Language Week/Vaiaso o le Gagana Sāmoa have just been announced. In 2011, the week will run from Sunday 29 May to Saturday 4 June to again coincide with Samoan Independence Day on 1 June.

The 11th National NZSLTA conference will be held at the Te Aro Campus of Victoria University, Wellington on 27-8 November 2010. Continue reading…

The theme of the two-day conference is Challenges in Sign Language Teaching and will feature both international and New Zealand presenters, a wine and cheese evening and an NZSL Storyfest event.

For more information visit www.wds.org.nz/nzslta or email conference@nzslta.org.nz . Registrations will be accepted until 31 October. The registration form is available on the website.