5. Conclusions — Ngā whakamutunga

Where New Zealand does well — Ngā mahi pai e oti nei i Aotearoa

Where we need to do better — Kia piki ake te pai i roto i enei wahanga

Top

Although the availability of education in New Zealand is good, in terms of the United Nation's 4-A framework of standards (discussed at the beginning of this chapter), New Zealand education is still not fully accessible, acceptable and adaptable. There are systemic disparities that need to be addressed.

Under international agreements, State parties are obliged to prohibit discrimination in access to education and to eliminate discrimination through education.

Table 4 (below) links aspects of the right to education that are of significance to New Zealand with the relevant United Nations conventions (ICESCR, UNCROC, CEDAW, and CERD).

Table 4: The right to education - aspects of significance to New Zealand and related United Nations Conventions

4-A FRAMEWORK The right to education - aspects of significance to New Zealand RELATED UNITED NATIONS CONVENTIONS
Availability New Zealand is performing well. ICESCR: Articles 13, 14 UNCROC: Article 28(1a), (1b)
Accessibility Formal and informal costs of education create barriers at all levels. ICESCR: Articles 13(2a), (2b), 14 UNCROC: Article 28 (1a), (1b) CEDAW: Article 10 (d)
  Participation rates for males, Māori, Pacific peoples, disabled people, and those from poor communities are disproportionately low. ICESCR: Article 13 UNCROC: Article 28(1e), 23(1)
  Māori and Pacific students have higher stand-down, suspension, exclusion and expulsion rates than those of other ethnicities, and males have higher rates than females. ICESCR: Article 13(1), (2) UNCROC: Article 28(1e) CERD: Article 5((e)(v)), 7
Acceptability There are disparate standards of education, particularly for disabled children and those from isolated schools or poor communities. ICESCR: Article 13(1) UNCROC: Articles 29(1a), 23(1) CERD: Articles 5((e)(v)), 7
  There is discrimination, bullying, and harassment, particularly over race, disability, sexual orientation and gender. ICESCR: Article 13 (1) UNCROC: Article 29 (1c) CERD: Articles 5((e)(v)), 7
Adaptability The gap in achievement between the lowest achieving students and those who are average achievers is increasing. Compared with other OECD countries, we have one of the widest gaps in educational performance. ICESCR: Article 13(1) UNCROC: Articles 29(1a), 23,(1)
  Achievement rates for males, Maori, Pacific peoples, disabled people, and those from poor communities are disproportionately low. ICESCR: Article 13 (1) UNCROC: Articles 29(1a), 23(1) CERD: Articles 5 ((e)(v)), 7