News

Tūrangawaewae

Tūrangawaewae is the Human Rights Commission's newsletter. You can read any of our editions of Tūrangawaewae by navigating the menu below: 

May

In this issue we cover:

  • Disability team to travel to UN for international conference: This month, Human Rights Specialist Erin Gough will travel to the United Nations in New York to attend the Conference of States Parties (COSP) to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). She fills us in on her upcoming trip. Read More...
  • Expert’s report on New Zealand’s seclusion and restraint practices causes stir: After international expert Dr Sharon Shalev’s visit last year, her resulting report into seclusion and restraint practices in New Zealand has been released with many shocked by her findings. Read More...
  • Draft Bill to bring protection to the workplace for victims of domestic violence: The Human Rights Commission recently submitted on Green Party MP Jan Logie’s Domestic Violence Protection Bill that seeks to create a system where businesses can better support victims of family violence. Read More...
  • Sports star support for former refugees: He’s one of the most photographed athletes in New Zealand but last month Sonny Bill Williams was the one wanting to take the photos as he visited Mangere Refugee Resettlement Centre for the first time. Read More...
  • Online Human Rights Education: To make sure as many New Zealanders as possible develop an understanding of human rights – what they are and what they mean – the Commission is developing an online education programme that will be delivered very soon. Read More...
  • Human Rights and the Treaty: With a long-term goal of affecting better policy development for Maori in Oranga Tamariki and the Ministry for Social Development, the Commission has been working with advisors for each department, strengthening their understanding of human rights and Te Tiriti o Waitangi. Read More...
  • Race Relations Day 2017: Knowing what to do when a racist attack is happening to you or in front of you was the focus of Race Relations Day 2017. Read More...
  • More work on putting UNDRIP into action needed: Nearly ten years on from the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), there remains a major ‘implementation gap’ between the rights protected by the Declaration and their realisation in practice. Read More...
  • He mahi anō me mahi e whakatinanatia ai te UNDRIP: Kua tata huri tōna tekau tau i te whakaūnga o te Whakapuakitanga o Ngā Tika Iwi Taketake e te Kotahitanga o Ngā Iwi o te Ao, engari ka nui te ango i ngā tika e tohua ana i te Whakapuakitanga me tōna whakatinanatanga. Read More..

Recent Publications and Submissions

March

In this issue we cover:

  • Commission open letter calls for inquiry in to the abuse of thousands while under state care: Recently, the Commission launched the #NeverAgain campaign, asking New Zealanders to join our call for a comprehensive inquiry into the abuse of thousands of people, many of them children, while they were under the care of the Government. Read More...
  • E karanga ana te reta puare a te Kōmihana kia uiuitia te tūkinotanga o te manomano tāngata i ngā whakahaere manaaki o te Kāwanatanga: Nō nā tata nei, ka whakarewaina e te Kōmihana tāna kaupapa #NeverAgain, e pātai ana ki te iwi whānui o Aotearoa kia tautoko rātau i te karanga kia āta uiuitia te tūkinotanga o te manomano tāngata, ko te tokomaha he tamariki, i a rātau e purihia ana ki roto i ngā whakahaere manaaki o te Kāwanatanga. Read More...
  • Aotearoa’s Lost Generation – Dame Susan Devoy: Years ago in a small town a Maori boy was caught stealing lollies at the local four square. A report labelled him a ‘thug” and he was made a state ward. He was ten years old. Put in a boy’s home where he was physically and sexually abused, he ended up doing very long stretches in isolation. He’d spend months at a time in a single cell. While there his parents died. When he was let out he was sent to live with a series of strangers, some of whom sexually and physically abused him. He was to spend time in and out of prison. He was an old man by the time he made meaningful contact with his whanau again. By then he’d lost so many things: language, whakapapa, whanau, childhood. Read More...
  • Dr Jackie Blue at CSW 61: Equal Employment Opportunities Commissioner, Dr Jackie Blue, has a busy year ahead, starting with International Women’s Day on 8 March and her attendance at the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) in New York in the week following. Read More...
  • Commission welcomes historic conviction quashing announcement: The Commission recently welcomed Justice Minister Amy Adams’ announcement that historic convictions for sex between men in New Zealand will be quashed. Read More... 
  • Further adjustments to Education Amendment Bill needed for students with disabilities: For New Zealand to meet our human rights obligations, it’s vital that our education system is inclusive. The Commission recently provided a submission to the Education and Science Committee the make sure the Education (update) Amendment Bill 2016 achieves that aim. Read More...

December

In this issue we cover:

  • Diversity forum sees launch of That’s Us campaign: Since being launched at the Diversity Forum on the first of September this year, the Human Rights Commission’s That’s Us campaign has engaged with more than one million people through sharing everyday people’s real life stories of racial prejudice. Read more...
  • Young New Zealanders leading the way forward: The Human Rights Commission says young New Zealanders’ growing acceptance and celebration of Maori language and culture shows how bright the future for race relations can be. Read more... 
  • Commission welcomes Government’s commitment to ban seclusion in schools: In the same month that the Commission welcomed an international expert to assist with a review of seclusion practices in New Zealand, news that the government would ban seclusion practices in schools was welcomed. Read more... 
  • Red Zone Report: In early November, the Commission released the second of two reports on monitoring human rights in the Canterbury earthquake recovery. Read more... 
  • Forums prove to be a strong UNDRIP conversation starter: Over the past few months the Commission held the first two of several Forums on the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) to develop all New Zealanders’ understanding and application of it. Read more...
  • Commission holds public consultation meetings to discuss key issues facing New Zealand: The Commission recently held three public consultations to discuss issues that are likely to have an impact on New Zealand’s human rights record, which is set to be reviewed by UN Committees next year. Read more... 
  • Commission launches videos to encourage organisations to adopt a family violence policy: In November, the Commission enlisted the support of a number of well-known New Zealand organisations to encourage workplaces to adopt a family violence policy. Read more...
  • One Week in Bangkok: Human Rights Specialist Erin Gough writes about her experiences at the APF Human Rights Education Workshop that was held in Bangkok in September. Read more...
  • Love Rugby Respect Women: Following an internal investigation by NZ Rugby into an incident involving a woman called Scarlette and members of the Chiefs, the Commission, alongside a number of prominent kiwi women and New Zealanders, called for change. Read more...
  • New campaign manager joins Commission: Human Rights Commission Digital Campaign Manager, Ryan Mearns, has been in the role for just over three months now and has been working to deliver some of the Commissions key campaigns. Read more... 
  • Online human rights education and training resources being developed: In an effort to further promote and advocate respect for, and an understanding and appreciation of, human rights in New Zealand, the Commission is currently developing an online human rights education curriculum. Read more...

August

In this issue we cover:

Articles:

  • New Zealand's 12th Diversity Forum focused on the future: A former child soldier and refugee, who is now an internationally renowned human rights lawyer, headlines this year’s 12th Diversity Forum at Te Papa in Wellington. Read more...
  • Refreshed A to Z Pre-Employment Guide released: A revised and refreshed resource, published by the Commission, sees employers and employees armed with answers to the important pre-employment questions they may have. Read more...
  • Intelligence and Security Bill a good effort, but scrutiny needed: Earlier this month Prime Minister John Key introduced a bill to update the legislative framework and improve the transparency of New Zealand’s intelligence and security agencies. Read more...
  • Seclusion and Restraint review about to get underway: Humanely meeting the needs of detained individuals, including those who have complex mental health and psycho-social conditions, is a key area of concern. This year, the Commission is leading a review into seclusion and restraint practices in New Zealand. Read more...
  • Indigenous Rights Information Series starting in September: On 13 September 2007, the UN General Assembly adopted the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), after almost 20 years of negotiation. So, what does the Declaration mean for New Zealand? Read here...
  • Public reporting needed to address gender pay gap: The Human Rights Commission’s Tracking Equality at Work tool, which has been recently updated with 2015 data, illustrates the urgent need for public reporting on gender pay gaps. Read here...
  • Day of World's Indigenous Peoples a reminder of action needed on UNDRIP: International Day of the worlds Indigenous Peoples was observed on 9 August and was timely reminder that more needs to be done by New Zealand to ensure the participation and representation of Maori New Zealanders. Read here...
  • Commission's Strategic Communications Specialist receives Harmony Award: Commission staff often work quite closely with a range of ethnic communities. This month, Strategic Communications Specialist Christine Ammunson received an award from one of those communities for her efforts. Read here...
  • Business and Human Rights Forum: The Commission held its first Business and Human Rights forum earlier this month and it was a great success with businesses and government departments alike keen to learn more about what respecting human rights might look like in their organisation. Read here...
  • Commissioner Richard Tankerlsey - "I stopped playing Rugby because  I'm gay": For Commissioner Tankersley, we will have arrived when a gay guy can play third grade rugby for his local club and turn up to the after function with his male partner. Read here...
  • Commission welcomes Simon Xu to the team: In early July the Commission welcomed Simon Xu, a Masters level student at the China University of Political Science and Law - Institute for Human Rights (CUPL), to the country as part of the New Zealand Human Rights internship. We spoke to Simon about why he’s taking part in the programme and what he hopes to learn during his time here. Read here...
  • Auckland Human Rights Commission office move: With construction underway for the City Rail link and the demolition of the Downtown Shopping centre taking place next to Zurich House, the timing couldn’t have been better for the Commission to move to a new home earlier this month. Read more...

Submissions and Publications

Publications

June

In this issue we cover:

Articles:

  • Bullying Week NZ: The very first Bullying Free NZ Week took place from 16 – 20 May, marking the progress that has been made on bullying prevention and highlighting the further work that can be done to make sure all children are safe at school. Read more...
  • The power of the media and everyday New Zealanders: Most of us already realise our mainstream media has a powerful influence on people. What some of us do not already realise is that our media is neither neutral nor objective. Read more...
  • Rainbow Tick accreditation progressing well: New Zealand is the first country in the world to develop an official standard addressing rainbow inclusive workplaces. The Commission is on track to receive its own Rainbow Tick of approval. Read here...
  • Business and Human Rights: Save the Date invitations have been sent and the countdown has officially begun to the Business and Human Rights forum, which takes place in August this year. Read here...
  • Gender Stocktake Report: The Government and Ministers continue to lead by example with the highest ever percentage of women on State Sector boards and committees, but results show further work needed to hit original 50% target. Read here...
  • When a kerb is more than a kerb: Getting to where you need to be isn’t easy when you have a disability. Seven Sharp’s Kristin Hall recently spent some time with Human Rights specialist Erin Gough navigating her way around the streets of Wellington. Read here...
  • Substance Addiction Bill: The Substance Addiction Bill (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) has had its first reading in Parliament recently, and while it’s a step in the right direction there is still more to be done to ensure it meets the needs of those who need it most. Read here...
  • The OPCAT and what that can do for aged care in New Zealand: A growing aging population means there is increased demand for quality aged residential and community care. With those in need of that care and support often ending up in situations where they are vulnerable, Governments must ensure that they are protected and treated with dignity. Read here...
  • Government announces $46m to support victims of sexual violence: The Human Rights Commission has welcomed the Government’s announcement of $46 million over four years to support victims and prevent sexual violence. Read more...

Submissions and Publications

Publications

March

In this issue:

  • CSW 60
  • Assisted Dying - the human rights debate
  • Treaty x Thirty
  • Waitangi Day 
  • A profile of Lemlem Azanaw
  • The HRC at the UN 
  • Accommodation and Human Rights 

You can read the March edition of Tūrangawaewae here.

You can read the newsletter in an accessible word format here.

December

In this issue:

  • Living in the red zone
  • Mental health in places of detention
  • The Attitude Awards
  • Superdiversity 
  • Business and human rights

You can read the December edition of Tūrangawaewae here.

You can read the newsletter in an accessible word format here.

September

In this issue:

  • Mental Health at work
  • To be Who I am
  • The State of Care
  • Dr Gill Hicks

You can read the September edition of Tūrangawaewae here.

You can read the newsletter in an accessible word format here.

June

In this issue:

  • Raising the refugee quota
  • NZ Human Rights Plan of Action 
  • Erima Henare
  • Interviews with Disability Issues Minister Nicky Wagner and Children's Commissioner Russell Wills.

You can read the June edition of Tūrangawaewae here.

March

In this issue:

  • Supreme Court Ruling on the red zone 
  • Ethnic Communities Minister 
  • Race Relations Day 
  • Access to inclusive education

You can read the March edition of Tūrangawaewae here.

You can read the newsletter in an accessible word format here.

January

In this issue:

  • The Kristine Bartlett 'Equal Pay' case 
  • An interview with Minister of Justice Amy Adams 
  • The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child  
  • The Treaty of Waitangi and UNDRIP

You can read the January edition of Tūrangawaewae here.

An Accessible Word version is available here.