News

Tūrangawaewae

Tūrangawaewae is the Human Rights Commission's newsletter. You can read any of our editions of Tūrangawaewae by navigating the menu below: 

June

In this issue we cover:

Articles:

  • Bullying Week NZ: The very first Bullying Free NZ Week took place from 16 – 20 May, marking the progress that has been made on bullying prevention and highlighting the further work that can be done to make sure all children are safe at school. Read more...
  • The power of the media and everyday New Zealanders: Most of us already realise our mainstream media has a powerful influence on people. What some of us do not already realise is that our media is neither neutral nor objective. Read more...
  • Rainbow Tick accreditation progressing well: New Zealand is the first country in the world to develop an official standard addressing rainbow inclusive workplaces. The Commission is on track to receive its own Rainbow Tick of approval. Read here...
  • Business and Human Rights: Save the Date invitations have been sent and the countdown has officially begun to the Business and Human Rights forum, which takes place in August this year. Read here...
  • Gender Stocktake Report: The Government and Ministers continue to lead by example with the highest ever percentage of women on State Sector boards and committees, but results show further work needed to hit original 50% target. Read here...
  • When a kerb is more than a kerb: Getting to where you need to be isn’t easy when you have a disability. Seven Sharp’s Kristin Hall recently spent some time with Human Rights specialist Erin Gough navigating her way around the streets of Wellington. Read here...
  • Substance Addiction Bill: The Substance Addiction Bill (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) has had its first reading in Parliament recently, and while it’s a step in the right direction there is still more to be done to ensure it meets the needs of those who need it most. Read here...
  • The OPCAT and what that can do for aged care in New Zealand: A growing aging population means there is increased demand for quality aged residential and community care. With those in need of that care and support often ending up in situations where they are vulnerable, Governments must ensure that they are protected and treated with dignity. Read here...
  • Government announces $46m to support victims of sexual violence: The Human Rights Commission has welcomed the Government’s announcement of $46 million over four years to support victims and prevent sexual violence. Read more...

Submissions and Publications

Publications

March

In this issue:

  • CSW 60
  • Assisted Dying - the human rights debate
  • Treaty x Thirty
  • Waitangi Day 
  • A profile of Lemlem Azanaw
  • The HRC at the UN 
  • Accommodation and Human Rights 

You can read the March edition of Tūrangawaewae here.

You can read the newsletter in an accessible word format here.

December

In this issue:

  • Living in the red zone
  • Mental health in places of detention
  • The Attitude Awards
  • Superdiversity 
  • Business and human rights

You can read the December edition of Tūrangawaewae here.

You can read the newsletter in an accessible word format here.

September

In this issue:

  • Mental Health at work
  • To be Who I am
  • The State of Care
  • Dr Gill Hicks

You can read the September edition of Tūrangawaewae here.

You can read the newsletter in an accessible word format here.

June

In this issue:

  • Raising the refugee quota
  • NZ Human Rights Plan of Action 
  • Erima Henare
  • Interviews with Disability Issues Minister Nicky Wagner and Children's Commissioner Russell Wills.

You can read the June edition of Tūrangawaewae here.

March

In this issue:

  • Supreme Court Ruling on the red zone 
  • Ethnic Communities Minister 
  • Race Relations Day 
  • Access to inclusive education

You can read the March edition of Tūrangawaewae here.

You can read the newsletter in an accessible word format here.

January

In this issue:

  • The Kristine Bartlett 'Equal Pay' case 
  • An interview with Minister of Justice Amy Adams 
  • The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child  
  • The Treaty of Waitangi and UNDRIP

You can read the January edition of Tūrangawaewae here.

An Accessible Word version is available here.