Staying in the red zones

Monitoring human rights in the Canterbury earthquake recovery

He aha te mea nui o te ao? He tangata, he tangata, he tangata

What is the most important thing in the world? It is the people, it is the people, it is the people

The Canterbury earthquakes of 2010/11 were a stark reminder that New Zealand is highly susceptible to earthquakes. The scale of the damage meant that large, far-reaching decisions needed to be made, and it is important that we now assess these actions and what could have been done better.

In 2011 the Government made the decision to red zone earthquake-damaged land—a decision that ultimately affected 8,060 properties and more than 16,000 people across Greater Christchurch. 'Staying in the red zones' is a report by the New Zealand Human Rights Commission about the people living or owning vacant land in the residential red zones in mid-2015.

Read The Report

You can read the full report here: Staying in the red zones report

You can read a summary of the report here: Staying in the red zones summary report

We have also produced a human rights checklist to use in developing disaster preparedness, prevention and recovery responses. You can read it here

Listen to this episode of the Speak Up podcast that looks at the human rights implications of the post-earthquake recovery of Greater Christchurch:

Interviews

Interviews

Read the interviews of some of the people living in the Residential Red Zones in mid-2015. People were invited for an interview based on the geographic areas in which they lived and the issues they faced.

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Best practice guidelines for the prioritisation of vulnerable customers

Best practice guidelines for the prioritisation of vulnerable customers

Guidelines developed specifically members of the Insurance Council of New Zealand (ICNZ) and insurance brokers. They may also provide a useful guide for other social sector agencies.

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Human Rights Checklist

Human Rights Checklist

A human rights checklist to use in developing disaster preparedness, prevention and recovery responses.

Learn More